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Deadpool Reviewed



I enjoyed X-men Origins Wolverine. It wasn't a great film, but save for the overwrought drama of Hugh Jackman walking away from the helicopter he turned into a human BBQ pit, it was pretty good. I didn't associate Ryan Reynolds as the Merc With A Mouth until all the haters and purists made their opinions known, and even then, I thought it worked as an origin story. Plus I liked watching Scott Adkins (Undisputed 2 and 3) beat up Hugh Jackman and Liev Schrieber.

So I wasn't looking for redemption for the on-screen Marvel favorite. I had no expectations. I just wanted to see my favorite Marvel-Capcom 3 character do his thing.

There's no easy way to say this.
If you liked X-Men Origins Wolverine, go see this movie.
If you hated X-Men Origins Wolverine, go see this movie.
If you hated the Green Lantern movie, go see this movie three times.

Deadpool stands as the pinnacle of the Marvel franchise between 20th Century Fox and Marvel Studios. This is movie is damn near perfect.

Irreverent and hilarious as only Deadpool can be, it makes no pretenses. The movie knows what it is, it knows what its fans want and it delivers. In spades.

From the opening scene of this movie, you do not quit laughing. Literally, from the moment the credits begin to roll, you know exactly what you're getting.  Deadpool excels in that it never takes itself too seriously, even in its rare, dark moments.

Speaking of which, the dark moments in this film are sparse but powerful. Deadpool touts that he is not a hero, and he's not. His origin is the most horrifying ever displayed on the big screen. Think Wolverine is the most durable character in the Marvel universe? Think again.

Ryan Reynolds is to Deadpool the way Christopher Reeve is to Superman. His performance will make you forget, and forgive, both X-Men Origins and the abhorrent Green Lantern tripe. In fact, in his way, he apologizes for both.

Morena Baccarin will make every Firefly fan's wet dream a reality. She will also make you hate Ryan Reynolds with sheer envy. Her role as Deadpool's love interest is the stuff teenage wet dreams are made of. She's also the sentimental role of the film, using her potent, emotive abilities to just melt you down.

Everyone else is kind of a stand-in but the good news is, they know it. This film is about Deadpool, who doesn't just break the fourth wall, he lives outside of it. Ed Skrien (the beefed-up protagonist fro the recent Transporter reboot) and Carla Carano provide fun, but two-dimensional antagonists. Carla Corano started benching Ford F-250's to become an intimidating physical presence on screen.

Briana Hildebrand and Stefan Kapicic do well as obligatory X-Men standins, but Leslie Uggams steals the show as Wade's roommate.

The movie is tightly shot and unabashedly violent, even to make the most jaded cringe at times. No limb is safe from dismemberment, no body part can't be used as a weapon, and you'll be laughing your ass off the whole way through. Stan Lee gets the best cameo he's ever had, hands down.

Deadpool is the best movie to come out in ages, easily on par with Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Gory, sexy, horrifying, hilarious, perfectly cast, and a fun as all hell. As close to a perfect movie as I've seen.

Oh, by the way. Your kids will torrent this from the interwebs. You don't want this.

Comments

That's good to hear! Going to see it tonight.

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